A Wrokplace Health and Safety Audit

June 11, 2018 Health

Introduction The specific aim of this compliance audit is to identify a chosen workplaces’ current level of health and safety performance. This was completed through the assessment of their compliance with legislative requirements and an evaluation of the effectiveness of current operating health and safety systems. Firstly, this report provides a detailed description of the workplace and the audit methodology used. The industry standards, hazards, injury rates & legislative standards of the hospitality, recreation and other services industry are then analysed and finally the results of the audit conducted are presented.

Description of Workplace The workplace audited was a small cafe located on the Gold Coast. The cafe employs 8 staff, with a maximum of 5 working at one time. The cafe is open Monday to Friday from 7:00 till 16:00, and is closed on public holidays. The staff work one of 3 shift durations, either 6:30-16:00, 8:30-14:00 or 10:00-15:00. Each staff is required to take a half hour break when appropriate throughout the shift. The workplace is comprised of two main areas, front of house (FOH) and back of house BOH). The FOH is further broken into sections.

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These include, hot and cold drink preparation station, deli cabinets to store both hot and cold foods, cold sandwich preparation area and sandwich toasting area, refrigeration and freezer systems and dry storage areas. The FOH is also where customers are served. The BOH is also broken into sections, the food cooking area including microwave, toaster, deep fryer, oven and grill and the food preparation area. Furthermore, there is a dishwashing area, several compartmentalised utensil storage areas, refrigeration and freezer systems, dry storage areas and a small area for employee’s to store their bags etc.

Throughout the day the normal activities of the workplace include serving customers, restocking, food preparation, dishwashing, cleaning, cooking and deliveries. Audit Methodology The audit was conducted on Monday morning, Wednesday afternoon and Thursday midday. This was done to get an accurate feel for how the workplace functioned and to help identify, not only, the prominent but also the concealed risks. The workplace was observed both visually and through conducting interviews with the owner/manager and staff.

A series of checklists (refer appendix A) were used to evaluate the organisations performance in 5 areas; safety management systems, consultation, manual tasks, hazardous substances and first aid. Industry Standards, Hazards, Injury Rates & Legislative Standards According to the Industry Action place for this sector (Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, 2008), for hospitality, recreation and other services industry, in 2005–06, nearly 379,200 people were employed in this industry. This total represents 19% of all employed people in Queensland.

Overall, the number of people working in the hospitality, recreation and other services industry has increased by 12% between 2003–04 and 2005–06 (Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, 2008). Furthermore, the workers in this industry tend to be younger than workers in other industries. In 2005–06, 68% of those employed in this industry were under 45 years, compared with almost 64% for all other industries. The hospitality, recreation and other services industry experienced a marginal increase in the proportion of workers 45 years and over between 2003–04 and 2005–06 from 31% to 32%.

Based on workers’ compensation claims data, the fatality rate for the hospitality, recreation and other services industry in 2005–06 was 2. 5 fatalities per 100,000 workers (Australian Safety and Compensation Council, 2007). Additionally, the fatality rate in this industry has declined steadily since 2003–04, and was lower than the fatality rate of 3. 2 fatalities per 100,000 workers across all industries. In 2005–06, the non-fatal injury rate was 10. 6 claims per 1,000 workers. This is below the non-fatal injury rate of 14. 8 claims per 1,000 workers for all industries (Australian Safety and Compensation Council, 2007).

The non-fatal injury rate has declined by 3% since 2003–04. Between 2003–04 and 2005–06, 59% of non-fatal injury claims were due to musculoskeletal disorders (Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, 2008). Half of musculoskeletal disorder claims were from handling, lifting, carrying or putting down objects (e. g. cartons, boxes, cases, drums, kegs and barrels). Another 21% of musculoskeletal disorder claims were due to falls on the same level. Many of these occurred in the accommodation, cleaning services and cafe and restaurant sub-sectors.

Workers most commonly injured included commercial cleaners, labourers and other workers providing manual labour, kitchen hands, general waiters, bar attendants, chefs, sales assistants for food and drink products and security officers (Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, 2008). Traumatic injuries represented a third of non-fatal injury claims between 2003–04 and 2005–06 (Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, 2008). Fractures were responsible for 30% of traumatic injuries, followed by open wounds (28%) and contusions and crushing injuries (19%).

Over half of the injuries were caused by one of the following falls on the same level, hitting moving or stationary objects or contact with hot objects (e. g. oil and fat). Workers commonly injured were commercial cleaners, kitchen hands, chefs, cooks and waiters. Conclusion The purpose of this report has been to demonstrate a chosen workplaces’ current level of health and safety performance. This was completed by performing a audit on the workplace and then assessing their compliance with the legislative requirements. The effectiveness of current operating health and safety systems were evaluated.

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