Magnetic Field and Electromagnet

July 9, 2017 Physics

Electromagnet (Simple Features and Uses) An Investigatory Project Presented to Basic Education Department University of Perpetual Help GMA In Partial Fulfilment for The Requirements in Physics By: Anjanette L. Pascual Coleen Rose S. Saturnino Veverley Jayris M. Ochavo February 26, 2010 Mr. Lemuel F. Valdez Teacher Table of Contents I. Introduction A. Scope and Delimitation II. Statement of the Problem III. Definition of Terms IV. Related Studies V. Methodology a. Materials and Equipment used b. Procedure VI. Findings and Conclusions VII. Recommendations

Acknowledgement First all we like to thank God for guiding us every time we have meetings and trials of our experiment. We would like to express our deepest gratitude to all those who gave us the possibility to complete this investigatory project. Our sincere thanks to all the people who have contributed to and worked for this. Especially to our parents who are always supporting us in all we do. We also would like to give thank to our Physics Teacher, Sir Lemuel F. Valdez for encouraging, inspiring and giving pointers to improve and to finish this project.

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We also would like to give thanks to Ms. Shiela Mae Hisugan of First Year Planning for providing us the magnet we needed for the experiment and to Mar-Leo Trading for providing the materials that we used. And lastly we would like to give thanks to Mrs. Analyn Saturnino for the snacks that we ate every time we had our group discussion. Abstract Title: Electromagnet (Simple features and uses) No. of Pages: 9 This investigatory project aims to illustrate how to make an electromagnet. It also aims to illustrate the simple features and uses of a basic sample of a electromagnet.

This study wants to show the relationship between electricity and magnet. In this study we want to show that the electric current passes through the coil round around the screw, it creates a magnetic field that reaches out in expanding circles. When wire carrying electricity is twisted into a coil. The magnetic field twists with the coiled wire, causing the magnetic field lines to concentrate inside the coil. This creates a powerful magnetic effect inside the coil. Chapter 1 THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING Introduction An electromagnet is formed when a current carrying wire is wrapped around an iron core.

The strength of the electromagnet depends on, among other things, the number of times the wire is wrapped around the core and the amount of current that is flowing through the wire. The Electromagnet Experiment Stand is a device that demonstrates the relationship between the strength of an electromagnet and the number of coils wrapped around its core as well as the relationship between the strength of an electromagnet and the amount of current flowing through its coils. Scope and Delimitation This investigatory project focuses mainly on the following: Relationship of electricity and magnetism.

The electromagnet itself. Purpose of the electromagnet. The solenoid. Statement of the Problem What is the purpose of electromagnet? How can we make an electromagnet? Definition of Terms Magnet – Middle English magnete, from Anglo-French, from Latin magnet-, magnes, from Greekmagnes (lithos), literally, stone of Magnesia, ancient city in Asia Minor. Electromagnet – A core of magnetic material (as iron) surrounded by a coil of wire through which an electric current is passed to magnetize the core. Electromagnetism – Magnetism developed by a current of electricity.

A fundamental physical force that is responsible for interactions between charged particles which occur because of their charge and for the emission and absorption of photons, that is about a hundredth the strength of the strong force, and that extends over infinite distances but is dominant over atomic and molecular distances —called also electromagnetic force. Coil – A wound spiral of two or more turns of insulated wire, used to introduce inductance into a circuit. Any of various devices of which such a spiral is the major component. Battery – A combination of apparatus for producing a single electrical effect.

A group of two or more cells connected together to furnish electric current. Penny – The term penny (like 10p) originated in England many years ago. Ten penny, four penny, etc. , nails got their names from the fact that one hundred nails of that size cost ten pence, four pence, etc. Today penny represents the definite length of a nail measured from the head to the tip of the point. The term penny is still shown by using the English Pence sign p. Chapter 2 REVIEW OF RELATED STUDIES I. Related Studies The first electromagnet was built by an Englishman William Sturgeon, in 1825.

He bent a soft iron bar, insulated it by coating it with varnish, and wound 18 turns or cooper wire around it. When a current from a n electric cell was passed through the coil, the seven ounce bar (about 200g) was able to lift another iron bar weighing seven pounds (about 3178g). An improvement to this simple device was made in 1831 in the United States by Joseph Henry, who found it was better to insulate the wire rather than the bar. Inside an electric motor you will wrapped around a bare metal. Chapter 3 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY II. Methodology A. Material and Equipment used 1. Coil 2.

Screw = 10p is a good size (10P = 10-penny – 3-inches, the size of the nail) 3. Two 1. 5 volt D-cell batteries, and or a 12-volt lantern battery 4. Wire cutter 5. A “knife” switch – you should be able to find this in a hobby shop, electronic supply or a hardware store. Get a DC (direct current) switch ** 6. Electrical tape 7. AVR B. Procedures 1. Wrap the coil that has been stripped bare very tightly around the screw – at least 50 times. Cut the wire leaving a few inches of wire at each end. 2. Tape down the end of the wire from the top of the screw to the negative pole of the battery.

Make sure the wire is touching the battery end. 3. Open the knife switch and connect the coil from the bottom end of the screw to the terminal on the knife switch. 4. Cut another short piece of coil and tape the coil to the positive pole of the battery. 5. Connect the coil from the battery to other terminals on the knife switch. 6. Close the circuit by closing the knife switch. When you do that, you create a circuit of electricity that passes through the coil round around the screw. 7. Touch the point of the screw to a couple of paper clips and watch what happens.

Chapter 4 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS III. Findings 1. When the electric current passes through the coil round around the screw, it creates a magnetic field that reaches out in expanding circles. When wire carrying electricity is twisted into a coil, it is called a solenoid. The magnetic field twists with the coiled wire, causing the magnetic field lines to concentrate inside the coil. This creates a powerful magnetic effect inside the coil called an electromagnet. I therefore conclude that a coil is a good conductor of heat and energy. 2.

The magnetic field inside the coil causes the tiny magnetic fields in the metal of the screw to be aligned in one direction (all the north poles point the same way). These little fields all pointing in the same direction add to the coil and make the magnet strong enough to pick up some objects. I therefore conclude that we can produce a man-made magnet. IV. Recommendations * This electromagnet can be used as an electric lock for doors, and drawers. * This electromagnet can be enhanced by using a high source of power. * This electromagnet can be improved by adding alarms for security purposes. *

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